Found 52 Listings  |  «  Page 1 of 5  »

Giovanni Battista Falcieri (known as “Tita”) (1798–1874),  Very important painting.depicting the bodyguard of Lord Byron. An honored and proud warrior, a true Philhellene , who fought in the Greek war of independence. Tita was present at his death in Missolonghi in 1824. He later accompanied Benjamin Disraeli on his tour of the Orient, before becoming the valet of Isaac D'Israeli.Following Byron's funeral Tita remained in England and served as valet to Byron's friend John Cam Hobhouse, before returning to Greece to fight in the Greek War of Independence in 1825. In 1828 he returned to England and served as valet to James Clay on his Grand Tour 1829/30.  Falcieri subsequently joined Benjamin Disraeli on his tour of the Orient in 1830/31 and was then employed as valet to Isaac D’Israeli at Bradenham Manor in Buckinghamshire between 1832 and 1848. On Isaac D’Israeli’s death, Hobhouse arranged for him to be employed as a Government messenger.[3] He numbered among his acquaintance the Count D’Orsay, who presented him with a valuable emerald ring in gratitude for his assistance in relation to a posthumous portrait of Byron.[2]
Map of Greece, Morea (Peloponnese), Crete, Cyprus, including Euboea, Kythira, Mytilene, Chios, Rhodes,Corfu, Milos, Santorini, Ios,Zakynthos,
Portrait of a Boy, A portrait is a painting, photograph, sculpture, or other artistic representation of a person, in which the face and its expression is predominant. The intent is to display the likeness, personality, and even the mood of the person. For this reason, in photography a portrait is generally not a snapshot, but a composed image of a person in a still position. A portrait often shows a person looking directly at the painter or photographer, in order to most successfully engage the subject with the viewer.
golden Gate in Thessaloniki.or the Arch of Galerius or Kamara,Arch of Galerius, stands on what is now Egnatia & Dimitrios Gounari Street. The arch was built in 298 to 299 AD and dedicated in 303 AD to celebrate the victory of the tetrarch Galerius over the Sassanid Persians and capture of their capital Ctesiphon in 298.[2] The structure was an octopylon (eight-pillared gateway) forming a triple arch that was built of a rubble masonry core faced first with brick and then with marble panels with sculptural relief. The central arched opening was 9.7 m wide and 12.5 m high, and the secondary openings on other side were 4.8 m wide and 6.5 m high. The central arch spanned the portion of the Via Egnatia (primary Roman road from Dyrrhacium to Byzantium) that passed through the city as a Decumanus (east-west major street). A road connecting the Rotunda (125m northeast) with the Palace complex (235m southwest) passed through the arch along its long axis.  Only the northwestern three of the eight pillars and parts of the masonry cores of the arches above survive: i.e., the entire eastern side (4 pillars) and the southernmost one of the western pillars are lost.[3] Extensive consolidation with modern brick has been performed on the exposed masonry cores to protect the monument. The two pillars flanking the central arched passageway retain their sculpted marble slabs, which depict the wars of Galerius against the Persians in broadly panegyric terms.
View from the Dodecanese islands, probably Symi.-  Symi, also transliterated as Syme or Simi (Greek: Σύμη), is a Greek island and municipality. It is mountainous and includes the harbor town of Symi and its adjacent upper town Ano Symi, as well as several smaller localities, beaches, and areas of significance in history and mythology. Symi is part of the Rhodes regional unit.[2]  The economy of Symi was traditionally based on the shipbuilding and sponge industries. The population reached 22,500 at its peak during that period.[3] Symi's main industry is now tourism,[4] and its permanent population has declined to 2,500, with a larger population during the summer.[5]
 RED HORSEMEN
Portrait of a Mamluk soldier- Travellers Art, Orientalist Art, Philhellenic Art.. Mamluk is depicted seating on a rock holding his sword.
Sipahi Ottoman Cavalry Corps. Sipahi (Ottoman Turkish: سپاهی‎, translit. sipâhi, Turkish pronunciation: [sipaːhi]) were two types of Ottoman cavalry corps, including the fief-holding provincial timarli sipahi, which constituted most of the army, and the regular kapikulu sipahi, palace troops. Other types of cavalry which were not regarded sipahi were the irregular akıncı (
VIEW OF THE TOWN OF SALONA AND RUINS OF AMPHISSA THE ANCIENT CAPITAL OF OZOLAIA LOCRIS - TRAVELERS, PHILHELLENIC WORKS OF ART, ORIENTALIST ART
RUINS OF ORCHOMENOS BOEOTIA GREECE - TRAVELLERS ART, PHILHELLENIC WORKS OF ART, ORIENTALIST ART -
VIEW OF THE ATHENS ACROPOLIS, LITHOGRAPH BASED ON THE DRAWING BY WILLIAM PARS DURING THEIR VISIT TO ATHENS IN 1764 1766 & PUBLISHED 1788 . ONE CAN CLEARLY SEE THE MEDIEVAL FORTIFICATIOS BY THE FRANKISH RULERS OF ATHENS - TRAVELERS ART, PHILHELLENIC ART, ORIENTALIST ART
THE BLUE BICYCLE

Found 52 Listings  |  «  Page 1 of 5  »